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The deadline for submissions is 1 March 2007.

The 2007 Denver X-ray Conference would like to thank the following sponsors:

 

 

WORKSHOPS - Monday & Tuesday 30–31 July

The exact date & time of each workshop will not be determined until April 2007.

XRD & XRF

X-ray Optics
Organizer & Instructors:
G.J. Havrilla, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, havrilla@lanl.gov
N. Gao, X-ray Optical Systems, Inc., East Greenbush, NY
P. Høghøj, Xenocs SA, Sassenage, France
S. Cornaby, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

There are many X-ray optics available to spatially restrict X-rays for use in X-ray spectrometry. Each optic has its own characteristics, capabilities, advantages and disadvantages and unique application niches. This workshop will provide basic knowledge about X-ray optics specifically multilayer optics, polycapillary optics, doubly-curved crystal optics, and monocapillary optics. One of the objectives in this workshop is to help users understand the basic working principles and performance characteristics of these optics. Attendees will learn the function of an X-ray optical system in selected applications and their capabilities.

XRD

Fundamentals and Applications of Neutron Scattering for Characterizing Structural Materials and Components
Organizers & Instructors:
C. Hubbard, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, hubbardcr@ornl.gov
H. Choo, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, hchoo@utk.edu
D. Brown, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

Application of neutron diffraction in characterizing engineering materials in North America is becoming increasingly prevalent due to (a) the unique ability to provide microscopic insights to the physical and mechanical behavior of advanced materials and components and (b) the major investment made in new neutron scattering facilities at NIST, Los Alamos and Oak Ridge.

This workshop will provide a set of lectures and discussions on the fundamentals and applications of neutron diffraction that are relevant to the field of structural materials research. The presentations are intended for new users and engineers/scientists who are interested possibly using neutron scattering as a tool to their structural materials and engineering research and development. Specific topics will include:

  • Fundamentals of neutron scattering
  • Application of neutron scattering to fundamental materials sciences (with examples on the studies of deformation mechanisms, phase transformation, etc)
  • Application of neutron scattering to industrial problems (with examples on non destructive through thickness residual stress mappings)
  • In situ, time resolve neutron measurements of process and reactions
  • Guidance to the facilities, instruments, and opportunities for new users

Use X-rays? If so, try neutrons!

Two-dimensional XRD
Organizers & Instructors:
T.N. Blanton, Eastman Kodak Company Research Labs, Rochester, NY, tblanton@icdd.com
B. He, Bruker AXS, Inc., Madison, WI, bob.he@bruker-axs.com
R.G. Tissot, Sandia National Lab, Albuquerque, NM
U. Preckwinkel, Bruker AXS, Inc., Madison, WI

Two-dimensional diffraction data contains abundant information about the atomic arrangement, microstructure and defects of a solid or liquid material. In recent years, usage of two-dimensional diffractometer has dramatically increased in academic researches and various industries. This workshop covers recent progress in two-dimensional X-ray diffraction in terms of detector technology, geometry, and configuration of the two-dimensional diffractometer and various applications such as phase ID, texture, stress, crystallinity, combinational screening and thin film analysis.

Diffraction Peak Broadening and Peak Shape Analysis
Organizer & Instructors:
T. Ungár, Eotvos University, Budapest, Hungary, ungar@ludens.elte.hu
E. Schafler, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
D. Balzar, University of Denver, Denver, CO and NIST, Boulder, CO

Topics to be covered include:
1) Fundamentals of “Diffraction Peak Broadening and Peak Shape Analysis”—An Introduction
2) Size and size anisotropy
3) Strain and strain anisotropy
• dislocations as one of the prime sources of strain
• strain anisotropy rationalized by the concept of contrast factors
4) Planar defects, stacking faults, twin boundaries
5) Applications to polymers

Small Angle Scattering
Organizers & Instructors:
J.D. Londono, DuPont Company, Wilmington, DE, j-david.londono@usa.dupont.com
B.G. Landes, Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, bglandes@dow.com
J. Ilavsky, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL
N.S. Murthy, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT

The purpose of this workshop is to attract new people to the field—particularly those that may be wondering whether this is a useful technique for their application. The format will be tutorial in nature. It will be divided into three parts:
1. Summary of basic theory behind the technique
2. Details on instrumentation
3. Data analysis and examples
Specific topic suggestions of broad interest falling within the scope can be submitted for consideration in advance to j-david.londono@usa.dupont.com. Small-angle scattering has had impact in many areas (biology, materials science, metallurgy, polymer and colloids physics) over several decades, and is of even greater relevance today with the need to characterize structure at the nanoscale.

Rietveld Applications (Full day)
Organized by:
J.A. Kaduk, INEOS Technologies, Naperville, IL, James.Kaduk@ineos.com
J. Faber, International Centre for Diffraction Data, Newtown Square, PA, faber@icdd.com

Instructors & description to be announced.

X-ray Crystallography without Crystals
Organizer & Instructors:
V. Petkov, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI, petkov@phy.cmich.edu
I. Dragomir-Cernatescu, PANalytical, Inc., Natick, MA
P. Chupas, APS, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL
T. Proffen, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

Countless materials of technological and scientific importance (catalysts, composites, nanoceramics, drugs, minerals, etc.) are not like regular crystals, which possess long-range translational symmetry, due to the presence of a substantial intrinsic disorder and/or their very limited (nanometer) size. The powder diffraction patterns of such materials show a few Bragg-like peaks and a pronounced diffuse component rendering traditional crystallography difficult to apply. The workshop will illustrate the recent advances and inherent limitations of traditional (Bragg) diffraction, and concentrate on the nontraditional total (Bragg and diffuse) scattering and Pair Distribution Function approach in structure studies of anything but regular crystals.

XRF

Analysis of RoHS/WEEE Elements
Analysis of RoHS Elements – Consultants, Profs, and Testing Labs Take Notice!
Organizer & Instructors:
K.A. Russell, Innov-X Systems, Woburn, MA, krussell@innovxsys.com
B. Connors, Innov-X Systems, Woburn, MA

The EU RoHS Directive prohibits the import of consumer electronics containing Pb, Hg, Cr6+ or PBB and PBDE (Br compounds) at levels over 0.1% or Cd at levels over 0.01%. Versions of the RoHS Directive exist for China, Japan, India and other parts of the world. XRF has been highlighted as the screening technique of choice for producers and enforcers for the thousands of homogenous materials that require testing. The IEC-ACEA and XRF manufacturers have developed procedures for screening these regulated substances, from raw materials to end-products to recyclables (ELV and WEEE). This workshop will give an overview of the RoHS and Pb-free Directives along with practical, real-world XRF screening solutions for manufacturers and regulators alike.

XRF Sample Preparation (full day)
Organizer & Instructors:
J.A. Anzelmo, Anzelmo & Associates, Inc., Madison, WI, jaanzelmo@aol.com
J. Tully, Glen Mills, Inc., Clifton, NJ
L. Arias, Bruker AXS, Madison, WI
P. Daigle, Corporation Scientifique Claisse, Quebec, Canada
F. Feret, Alcan Intl. Ltd., Jonquiere, Canada

This workshop will start with a description of sampling techniques and equipment from bulk samples through the specimen prepared for analysis (Tully).  A discussion of basic and fundamental considerations with respect to sample preparation for XRF will follow (Anzelmo).  The morning session will be concluded by a discussion of the pertinent physical and chemical properties to be considered for metals preparation (Feret). The afternoon will begin with a discussion on the preparation of liquid samples (Arias), followed by a presentation on the basics of fusion (Daigle).

Basic XRF
Organized by:
W.T. Elam, EDAX/University of Washington, Redmond, WA, wtelam@apl.washington.edu
G.J. Havrilla, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

This workshop provides a basic introduction to the principles of XRF, and is specifically aimed at those new to the field. It will consist of a general overview of the technique, followed by more specific details of the basic principles with emphasis on understanding how to use XRF and what its capabilities are. A few particular applications will be presented to provide an understanding of how the basic principles affect actual practice.

Quantitative Analysis I & II (full day)
Organizer & Instructors:
M. Mantler, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria, michael.mantler@ifp.tuwien.ac.at
B. Vrebos, PANalytical, Almelo, The Netherlands
W.T. Elam, EDAX/University of Washington, Redmond, WA

Morning:
1. Fundamentals
2. Classical fundamental parameter models and mathematical foundation
3. Compensation Methods
4. Error analysis, iteration schemes, determination of elements by difference

Afternoon:
The afternoon session will discuss a selection of special methods at an advanced level.

Energy Dispersive XRF
Organizer & Instructors:
B. Scruggs, EDAX, Inc., Mahwah, NJ, Bruce.Scruggs@Ametek.com
B. Cross, CrossRoads Scientific, El Granada, CA
J. Heckel, Spectro Analytical, Kleve, Germany
C. Streli, P. Wobrauschek, Atominstitut – TU Wien, Wien, Austria

The Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) workshop provides a comprehensive review of XRF spectroscopy for both the beginner and experienced X-ray spectroscopist. Topics to be covered are instrumentation including sources and detectors, spectral processing, and qualitative and quantitative analysis. Applications will be discussed for “bulk” ED-XRF and “micro” ED-XRF analyses.

Trace Analysis
Organizer & Instructors:
P. Wobrauschek, Atominstitut - TU Wien, Vienna, Austria, wobi@ati.ac.at
G.J. Havrilla, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM
R. van Grieken, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium
M.L. de Carvallho, Centro de Fisica Atómica da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal

The workshop provides basic info rmation on available XRF techniques including conventional XRF and TXRF for trace element determination, sample preparation from classical to modern trends as dried spot method for trace analysis:way beyond microliters, definition of detection limits and Improving the detection limits and a large variety of application and info rmation of trace element levels and their importance in biological systems. Impact and importance on a wide range of materials including environmental and biological systems will be given.

 

SESSIONS - Wednesday, Thursday & Friday 1–3 August

The exact date and time of each session will not be determined until April 2007.

Plenary Session

Stardust—X-rays in Space
Organized by: W.T. Elam, EDAX/University of Washington, Redmond, WA, wtelam@apl.washington.edu

IN SITU MEASUREMENT OF HYDRATION OF MARTIAN SOILS AND ROCKS USING THE SCATTER COMPONENT OF THE XRF SPECTRUM
J.L. Campbell, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada

REMOTE X-RAY DIFFRACTION OF PLANETARY BODIES: WHAT IS MARS REALLY MADE OF?
D.L. Bish, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

X-RAYS ON MARS: HOW A HANDFUL OF PHOTONS IS HELPING REVOLUTIONIZE OUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE RED PLANET
B.C. Clark, III, Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Denver, CO

THE CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATORY: OBSERVING THE HIGH ENERGY UNIVERSE
R.J. Brissenden, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA

"Title to be announced"
G.J. Flynn, SUNY, Department of Physics, Plattsburgh, NY

XRD AND XRF

Stardust Characterization
Organized by: G.J. Havrilla, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, havrilla@lanl.gov
Scheduled Invited speakers:

"HYPERSPECTRAL NON-DESTRUCTIVE X-RAY ANALYSES OF THE 81P/WILD 2 COMETARY GRAINS"
A. Simionovici, Observatoire des Sciences de l'Univers de Grenoble, Grenoble France

"ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR DISCRIMINATING STARDUST IN AEROGEL CAPTUE MEDIA"
S. Brennan, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA

"Title to be announced"
L. Vincze, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

"Title to be announced"
F.J.M. Rietmeijer, The Univeristy of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

Click here to submit an abstract

Detectors & Sources
Organized by: S.T. Misture, NYS College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, NY, misture@alfred.edu
Invited speaker(s) to be announced.

"NEXT GENERATION X-RAY DETECTOR FOR IN-HOUSE XRD"
T. Taguchi, Rigaku Corporation, Tokyo, Japan

New Developments in XRD & XRF Instrumentation
Organized by: V.E. Buhrke, Consultant, Portola Valley, CA, vebuhrke@sbcglobal.net
Abstracts should be submitted by technical representatives of a manufacturer. They should discuss specifications, and applications concerning one of their newest and most important products. Talks should include comments about software, XRD and XRF equipment, and accessories. No mention of prices or a comparison with competitors’ products can be included.

Analysis of Nanostructures
Organized by: R.L. Snyder, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, bob.snyder@mse.gatech.edu

NANOSTRUCTURES FROM DIFFRACTION—OBTAINING A ‘COMPLETE’ STRUCTURAL FINGERPRINT
T. Proffen, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

NANOSTRUCTURES MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION BY X-RAY DIFFRACTION
I. Dragomir-Cernatescu, PANalytical, Inc., Natick, MA

X-ray Optics
Organized by: G.J. Havrilla, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, havrilla@lanl.gov

LOW-POWER MONOCHROMATIC FOCUSED BEAM XRF USING DOUBLY CURVED CRYSTAL OPTICS
Z. Chen, X-ray Optical Systems, Inc., East Greenbush, NY

Microbeam X-ray Analysis
Organized by: I.C. Noyan, Columbia University, New York, NY, icn2@columbia.edu
G.J. Havrilla, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, havrilla@lanl.gov

COMBINED USE OF CONVENTIONAL AND CONFOCAL µ-XRF AND µ-XANES, µ-XRD, X-RAY ABSORPTION TOMOGRAPHY AND RAMAN SPECTROMETRY FOR SPECIATION ANALYSIS IN TWO AND THREE DIMENSIONS
K. Janssens, Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerp, Belgium

TOWARD NANOMETER RESOLUTION FOR STRAIN MAPPING IN SINGLE CRYTALS: NEW FOCUSING OPTICS AND DYNAMICAL DIFFRACTION ARTIFACTS
H. Yan, APS—Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL

XRD

Applications of Linear and Area Detectors for XRD
Organized by: B. He, Bruker AXS, Inc., Madison, WI, bob.he@bruker-axs.com
D. Balzar, University of Denver, Denver, CO and NIST, Boulder, CO, balzar@du.edu
T.N. Blanton, Eastman Kodak Company Research Labs, Rochester, NY,
tblanton@icdd.com

MULTITASKING ON CCD AND MWPC THREE-CIRCLE X-RAY DIFFRACTOMETERS
J.H. Reibenspies, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX

SOFTWARE FOR ANALYSIS AND REDUCING 2-D DATA
S. Vogel, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

Stress Analysis
Organized by: C. Goldsmith, IBM, Poughkeepsie, NY, cgoldsmi@us.ibm.com
T.R. Watkins, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, watkinstr@ornl.gov

INSIGHTS INTO THE DEFORMATION MECHANISMS OF HCP METALS FROM DIFFRACTION MEASUREMENTS
M. Daymond, Queen’s University, Kingston, Canada

INVESTIGATION OF CREEP DAMAGE EVOLUTION IN ALLOYS AND COMPOSITES USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION
A. Pyzalla, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf, Germany

Diffraction from Biopolymers and Biological Systems
Organized by: K.H. Gardner, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, khg@udel.edu
T. Forsyth, Institut Laue Langevin/Keele University, Grenoble, France, tforsyth@ill.fr

FLEXIBLE FILAMENTOUS VIRUS STRUCTURES FROM FIBER DIFFRACTION
G. Stubbs, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

TOWARDS AN UNDERSTANDING OF STRETCH ACTIVATION IN INSECT FLIGHT MUSCLE
T. Irving, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL

NEUTRON AND SYNCHROTRON X-RAY FIBER DIFFRACTION STUDIES OF CELLULOSE POLYMORPHS
P. Langan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

Polymers and Composites
Organized by: N.S. Murthy, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, sanjeeva.murthy@uvm.edu
H. Koerner, AFRL/MLBP, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, hilmar.koerner@wpafb.af.mil

SOFT-CONFINEMENTS OF CHIRAL SMECTIC PHASES ON CRYSTALLIZATION IN THE MACROSCOPIC MONODOMAINS OF A MAIN-CHAIN NON-RACEMIC LIQUID CRYSTALLINE POLYESTER
S. Cheng, University of Akron, Akron, OH

SAXS FROM POLYMER-CLAY COMPOSITES AND OTHER LAYERED SYSTEMS
C. Burger, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY

SCANNING X-RAY MICROBEAM EXPERIMENTS FOR THE INVESTIGATION OF DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE OF POLYMERS
M. Stamm, Leibniz-Institut fuer Polymerforschung Dresden e.V. (IPF), Dresden, Germany

MICRO- AND NANO- XRD ON POLYMERS
C. Riekel, Microfocus Beamline, Grenoble, France

Industrial Applications
Organized by: E.A. Payzant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, payzanta@ornl.gov
R.L. Snyder, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, bob.snyder@mse.gatech.edu
TITLE TO BE ANNOUNCED
B.R. Wheaton, Corning, Inc., Corning, NY

Neutron Analysis
Organized by: C.R. Hubbard, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, hubbardcr@ornl.gov

IN-SITU NEUTRON DIFFRACTION DURING CYCLIC DEFORMATION: STUDYING THE REVERSIBILITY OF DEFORMATION INDUCED TWINNING AND PHASE TRANSFORMATION
D. Brown, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

IN SITU NEUTRON DIFFRACTION STUDIES OF DEFORMATION INDUCED PHASE TRANSFORMATION IN AN ULTRAFINE GRAINED TRIP STEEL
H. Choo, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

XRF

Applications of Handheld XRF & Analysis of RoHS/WEEE Elements
Organized by: M.A. Zaitz, IBM, Hopewell Junction, NY, zaitz@us.ibm.com

IMPACT OF RoHS IDRECTIVES ON ADVANCES IN HANDHELD XRF SYSTEMS
S. Afshari, RMD Instruments, Watertown, MA

"Title to be announced"
S. Piorek, NITON Analyzers/Thermo Fisher Scientific, Billerica, MA

Fusion & Industrial Applications of XRF
Organized by: J.A. Anzelmo, Anzelmo & Associates, Inc., Madison, WI, jaanzelmo@aol.com

X-RAY FLUORESCENCE IN THE LIME INDUSTRY, AN IMPORTANT QUALITY CONTROL TOOL
D. Hoffman, Chemical Lime Company, Fort Worth, TX

"Applications of XRF in the Aluminum Industry"
F. Feret, Alcan Intl. Ltd., Jonquiere, Canada

Quantitative XRF
Organized by: W.T. Elam, EDAX/University of Washington, Redmond, WA, wtelam@apl.washington.edu

THE NIST TES MICROCALORIMETER, NOW AND IN THE FUTURE
T. Jach, National Institute of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD

Trace Analysis
Organized by: M.L. de Carvalho, Centro de Fisica Atómica da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal, luisa@cii.fc.ul.pt

HANDY WAVEGUIDE TXRF SPECTROMETER FOR NG SENSITIVITY
J. Kawai, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan

XRS, INDOOR AEROSOLS AND HUMAN HEALTH
R. Van Grieken, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium

TRACE ELEMENTS FOR CHARACTERIZATION ARTIFICIAL AGING PROCESSES IN MODERN PAPERS
M.L. de Carvalho, Centro de Fisica Atómica da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal


Contributed Abstracts
Abstracts are hereby solicited for oral presentation in any of the special sessions previously listed, or the XRD and XRF poster sessions. Not all contributed abstracts submitted for oral presentation will be placed in a special session, but rather, will default to poster presentation. Poster sessions will be held on Monday and Tuesday evening of conference week, in conjunction with the evening receptions. Abstracts of more general interest will be placed in oral sessions. The Organizing Committee considers the withdrawal of an abstract after it has been accepted and advertised as highly nonprofessional (except in special circumstances). Please try to secure travel funding and approvals before submitting your abstract.

 

 

For more information please contact Denise Zulli - zulli@icdd.com

 

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