2009 Denver X-ray Conference Information:

Program

DXC Sponsors:

Chemplex

Panalytical

Media Sponsors:

Ios Press

Materials Today

 

 

 

 

The 58th Annual DXC will be held 27-31 July 2009, Crowne Plaza Hotel, Colorado Springs, Colorado, U.S.A.

Abstract submission deadline has been extended until 10 March 2009

WORKSHOPS MONDAY & TUESDAY, 27 & 28 JULY

The exact date & time of each workshop will not be determined until April 2009.

XRD & XRF

X-RAY SOURCES/OPTICS DEVELOPMENT AND INTEGRATION
Organizers and Instructors:
A. Khounsary, APS—Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, amk@aps.anl.gov
G.J. Havrilla, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, havrilla@lanl.gov
J. Wiesmann, Incoatec GmbH, Geesthacht, Germany
G. Rosenbaum, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL
S. Kamtekar, N. Gao, X-ray Optical Systems, Inc., East Greenbush, NY

Source-optics integration to provide high X-ray throughput is of paramount importance for efficient utilization of any X-ray source. There are several optical systems each with its own characteristics, capabilities, advantages and disadvantages and unique application niches. This workshop will provide basic knowledge about X-ray optics (such as multilayer optics, polycapillary optics, doubly curved crystal optics, and monocapillary optics) with emphasis on the integration of optics and the source. One of the objectives in this workshop is to help users understand the basic working principles and performance characteristics of these optics. Attendees will learn the selection, function, and capabilities of an X-ray optical system for optimal source-optics performance.

ADVANCES IN DETECTOR TECHNOLOGY
Organizer and Instructors:
T.N. Blanton, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, NY, tblanton@icdd.com
M. Fransen, PANalytical B.V., Almelo, The Netherlands
B.B. He, Bruker AXS, Madison, WI
P. Salficky, Dectris Ltd., Villigen, Switzerland

Recent advances in X-ray detectors used for XRD and XRF allow for measurements with high sensitivity, high speed, and high accuracy. New detectors for phase identification, elemental analysis, texture, structure elucidation, etc., are available for users to take advantage of today. This workshop will cover recent developments in theory, instrumentation, data collection and analysis, as well as advantages and disadvantages of advanced X-ray detectors used for materials characterization.

XRD

QUANTITATIVE RIETVELD ANALYSIS—FULL DAY
Organizers and Instructors:
S.T. Misture, NYS College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, NY, misture@alfred.edu
R.L. Snyder, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, bob.snyder@mse.gatech.edu
A. Kern, Bruker AXS GmbH, Karlsruhe, Germany

As Rietveld analysis has become popular, the applicability in quantitative phase analysis has become clear. The workshop will center on the use of Rietveld analysis for quantitative phase analysis but will begin with a general description of the method for the novice user. We will focus, however, on the pitfalls and traps, then provide tips for successful quantification using Rietveld analysis. More advanced topics will include analysis of specimens with amorphous content, as well as an evaluation of the likely errors in the analysis.

PHASE IDENTIFICATION—METHODS AND TOOLS
Organizer and Instructors:
T.G. Fawcett, International Centre for Diffraction Data, Newtown Square, PA, dxcfawcett@outlook.com
C. E. Crowder, S.N. Kabekkodu, International Centre for Diffraction Data, Newtown Square, PA

Integration of powder and single crystal databases has resulted in tremendous growth in the Powder Diffraction File™. Over 650,000 material data sets have been published with PDF-4+ and PDF-4/Organics each exceeding 300,000 entries. Each entry is also getting more complex in terms of content and context, whereby bibliographic information, quality analyses, physical properties and experimental conditions are recorded. The growth in entry numbers, context, and content alters, and significantly improves, the phase identification processes. The workshop will focus on improved methods for phase identification that utilize data mining, pattern simulation, and multivariate analyses. We will also discuss methods used to evaluate the phase identification results and performance.

LINE PROFILE ANALYSIS
Organizers and Instructors:
I.C. Noyan, Columbia University, New York, NY, icn2@columbia.edu
D. Balzar, University of Denver, Denver, CO, balzar@du.edu

Line profile analysis has evolved into a powerful technique for assessing crystallite size, strain, and defects in materials. The workshop will focus on the determination of these properties by Rietveld refinement and other Whole Powder Pattern Fitting (WPPF) programs. A brief theoretical overview will be followed by a practical tutorial with recipes and examples of the determination of crystallite-size distribution and dislocation density
in different materials.

STRUCTURE SOLUTION
Organizer and Instructors:
S.T. Misture, NYS College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, NY, misture@alfred.edu
A. Kern, Bruker AXS GmbH, Karlsruhe, Germany

This workshop will focus on extracting crystal structures from powder diffraction data. As a first step, we will cover the process of indexing powder patterns using modern software with error corrections. Structure solutions using the simulated annealing and charge flipping approaches will be highlighted. In particular, we will show how heavy atom and equal atom problems can be approached using the two different methods. For the simulated annealing approach, we will demonstrate the use of individual atoms as well as the use of rigid bodies. Finally, the workshop will include a discussion of Fourier synthesis and chemical knowledge to reach full descriptions of structures.

PAIR DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION
Organizer and Instructors:
V. Petkov, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI, petkov@phy.cmich.edu
M. Gateshki, PANalytical B.V., Almelo, The Netherlands
P. Chupas, K. Chapman, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL

This workshop will offer practical training on in-house (Gateshki) and synchrotron (Chupas) high-energy X-ray diffraction experiments aimed at atomic PDFs analysis. Introduction to PDFs basics and training on 3D structure determination/refinement based on atomic PDFs will also be done (Petkov and Chapman).

XRF

BENEFITS AND LIMITATIONS OF HANDHELD XRF
Organizer and Instructors:
K. Russell, Innov-X Systems, Woburn, MA, krussell@innovxsys.com
M. Kreiner, Oxford Instruments, Elk Grove Village, IL
S. Piorek, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Billerica, MA
B. Kaiser, Bruker AXS, West Jordan, UT
P. Palmer, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA

This workshop will give an overview of Handheld XRF as a powerful analytical tool on its own, as well as in conjunction with other analytical techniques. The benefits and limitations of Handheld XRF will be illustrated through discussions of its technology; its application in industry, research, and the field; and its use as an instructional tool in the academic arena.

STRATEGIES FOR ADVANCED MATERIALS ANALYSIS WITH LAB & SR X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY
Organizer and Instructors:
S. Hayakawa, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan, hayakawa@hiroshima-u.ac.jp
J. Kawai, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
I. Nakai, Tokyo University of Science, Tokyo, Japan
Y. Muramatsu, University of Hyogo, Hyogo, Japan

XRF has made great advances in trace sensitivity and in spatial resolution with the use of synchrotron light sources. Moreover, characterization of trace elements in advanced materials has been realized by using X-ray absorption spectroscopy with the XRF yields method. To realize similar performance with the conventional X-ray sources, many state-of-the-art instruments have been invented. In this workshop, a review will be made on the present status of trace and micro analysis with the laboratory and the synchrotron light sources, and a strategy of choice will be indicated according to the samples to be analyzed.

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS—FULL DAY
Organizer and Instructors:
M. Mantler, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria, michael.mantler@ifp.tuwien.ac.at
B. Vrebos, PANalytical B.V., Almelo, The Netherlands
W.T. Elam, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

PART 1 (Morning):
1. Theoretical and mathematical foundation: Classical fundamental parameter models.
2. Practical application: Working curves and influence coefficients, compensation methods.

PART 2 (Afternoon):
1. How accurate is XRF? (e.g., standardless methods, light elements and low-energy lines, trace-analysis).
2. Obtaining net-intensities: Detector (spectrometer) response function; separation of overlapping peaks/deconvolution; background subtraction; artifacts in spectra.

BASIC XRF
Organizer and Instructors:
W.T. Elam, Ametek/EDAX Research Group and University of Washington APL, Seattle, WA,
wtelam@apl.washington.edu
G. Havrilla, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

This workshop provides a basic introduction to the principles of XRF, and is specifically aimed at those new to the field. It will start with a general overview of the technique, followed by more specific details of the basic principles. The emphasis will be on understanding how to use XRF and what its capabilities are. In the second half of the workshop, a few selected applications will be presented. The focus of this segment will be to provide an understanding of how the basic principles effect actual practice.

SPECIMEN PREPARATION—FULL DAY
Organizer and Instructors:
J.A. Anzelmo, Anzelmo & Associates, Inc., Madison, WI, jaanzelmo@aol.com
P. Daigle, Corporation Scientifique Claisse, Sainte-Foy, Quebec, Canada
L. Jacobs, Wyoming Analytical Laboratories, Golden, CO
L. Arias, Bruker AXS, Madison, WI

This workshop will begin in the morning with a review of liquid analysis techniques and equipment (Arias). A discussion of sample preparation physics, and basic operations and equipment for powder preparation and fusion will follow (Anzelmo). The afternoon session begins with a discussion of the preparation of coal, fly-ash, and other service laboratory applications (Jacobs). This will be followed by a discussion of the fusion of difficult samples, including peroxide fusions (Daigle).

TRACE ANALYSIS
Organizer:
M.A. Zaitz, IBM, Hopewell Junction, NY, zaitz@us.ibm.com
Description to be announced.

SESSIONS WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY & FRIDAY 29–31 JULY


The exact date and time of each session will not be determined until April 2009.
The conference ends at 12 noon on Friday, 31 July.

Plenary Session

GETTING THE LEAD OUT—AGAIN!
Chairs: R. Van Grieken, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium
G.J. Havrilla, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM
W.T. Elam, Ametek/EDAX Research Group and Univ. of Washington APL, Seattle, WA

Lead in FDA Regulated Products
R.M. Jacobs, San Francisco District Laboratory, U.S. Food & Drug Administration, Alameda, CA

System Overload!!!—Restoring Order with XRF
M. Fry, Intertek Ageus Solutions, Ontario, Canada

The Truths and Myths of Toys Testing for Lead—XRF to the Rescue
S. Piorek, NITON Analyzers, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Billerica, MA

XRD & XRF

NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN XRD & XRF INSTRUMENTATION
Chair: V.E. Buhrke, Consultant, Portola Valley, CA, vebuhrke@sbcglobal.net
Abstracts should be submitted by technical representatives of a manufacturer. They should discuss specifications, and applications concerning one of their newest and most important products. Talks should include comments about software, XRD and XRF equipment, and accessories. No mention of prices or a comparison with competitors’ products can be included.

X-RAY IMAGING
Chairs: H. Göbel, Siemens AG, Corp. Tech. and LabXA, Munich, Germany, herb.goebel@gmx.de
F. de Carlo, APS—Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, decarlo@aps.anl.gov

X-ray Imaging and Microscopy at Modern Synchrotrons
Q. Shen, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY

X-Ray Micro-Imaging with Phase Contrast and DEI using Laboratory Sources
M. Schuster, Siemens AG, Corp. Tech., Munich, Germany

Latest Developments in Micro and Nano Tomography at Petra
A. Haibel, GKSS Outstation at DESY, Hamburg, Germany

HIGH ENERGY X-RAY OPTICS FOR SYNCHROTRON RADIATION (50–150 KEV)
Chair: S.D. Shastri, APS—Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, shastri@aps.anl.gov

Challenges in Sagittal Focusing of High-Energy X-rays by Sagittally Bent Laue Crystals
Z. Zhong, NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY

Refractive X-ray Lenses for High-Energy Applications
B. Lengeler, II. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen, Germany

Optics for Nuclear Resonant Scattering at High Energies
T. S. Toellner, APS, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL

High-Energy X-ray Optics at the APS
S.D. Shastri, APS, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL

BIOENABLED MATERIALS
Chairs: R.L. Snyder, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, bob.snyder@mse.gatech.edu
V. Petkov, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI, petkov@phy.cmich.edu

Genetically Engineered Materials
R.L. Snyder, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

Nature-made Nanocrystals: PDF Study on Bacterial and Fungal MnO
V. Petkov, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI

Nanostructuring of Biomaterials—A Pathway to Optimizing Bone Grafting
T. Gerber, Rostock University, Rostock, Germany

Biomineral Ultrastructures Revealed by Synchrotron Spectromicroscopy
P. Gilbert, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

Lattice Distortions, Strain and Stress in Biologically Formed Crystals
B. Pokroy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Nanotechnology and Structure of Edible Fats
A. Marangoni, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada

XRD

STRESS ANALYSIS—FULL DAY
Chair: C. Goldsmith, IBM, Hopewell Junction, NY, cgoldsmi@us.ibm.com
Co-chair: T. Watkins, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

High Performance XRPD with a New Low Power Cr-Micro Focus Source
H. Göbel, Siemens AG, Corp. Tech. and LabXA, Munich, Germany

Nanoscale Strain Characterization in Microelectronic Materials Using X-ray Diffraction
C. Murray, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY

RIETVELD ANALYSIS—FULL DAY
Chairs: S.T. Misture, NYS College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, NY, misture@alfred.edu
R.L. Snyder, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, bob.snyder@mse.gatech.edu

Title to be announced.
C.J. Rawn, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

MATERIALS DEFORMATION STUDIES USING HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY DIFFRACTION—FULL DAY
Chairs: J. Almer, APS—Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, Almer@aps.anl.gov
D. Haeffner, APS—Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, haeffner@aps.anl.gov

Deformation Mechanisms in Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Metals Measured by In situ X-ray Diffraction
R.T. Ott, Ames Laboratory, Ames, IA

Title to be announced.
D. Brown, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

Single Grain Deformation Experiments at the APS 1-ID Beamline
U. Lienert, APS—Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL

LINE PROFILE ANALYSIS
Chair: D. Balzar, University of Denver, Denver, CO, balzar@du.edu

Analysis of Hierarchical Dislocation Arrangements at Different Length Scales
R. Barabash, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

HIGH RESOLUTION XRD
Chair: B. Tanner, University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom, b.k.tanner@dur.ac.uk

Laboratory-based Characterization of Heteroepitaxial Structures: Advanced Experiments not needing Synchrotron Radiation
P. Zaumseil, IHP, Frankfurt, Germany

Six Ways of Determining Film Thickness from High Resolution XRD Data
I.C. Noyan, Columbia University, New York, NY

HIGH THROUGHPUT XRD
Chair: I. Takeuchi, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, takeuchi@umd.edu
Co-chair: Y.S. Chu, APS—Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL

High-throughput XRD and Analysis for Rapid Determination of Phase Distribution Across Combinatorial Libraries
I. Takeuchi, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Structural Investigation of Ge-Co-Mn Epitaxial Thin-Film System Using X-ray Micro Probe
Y.S. Chu, APS—Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL

Time-Resolved Structural Studies: Strategies for Rapidly Imaging and Analyzing Large Data Sets
M.J. Kramer, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

XRF

ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS
Chair: R. Van Grieken, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium, rene.vangrieken@uantwerpen.be

Distribution, Characteristics and Implications of Toxic Elements found in Environmental Investigations based on Analytical Techniques
L. Luo, National Research Center of Geoanalysis, Beijing, P.R. China

TXRF Analysis of Ultrafine Particles from Motor Vehicle Emissions
S. Török, KFKI Institute of Atomic Energy, Budapest, Hungary

Simultaneous X-ray and Ion Beam Techniques for the Characterisation and Fingerprinting of Fine Particle Air Pollution and its Sources in the Asian Region
D. Cohen, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Menai, Australia

FUSION AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS OF XRF
Chair: J.A. Anzelmo, Anzelmo & Associates, Inc., Madison, WI, jaanzelmo@aol.com

Applications of XRF in the Glass Industry
L. Schurter, Owens Corning Science and Technology Center, Granville, OH

TRACE ANALYSIS
Chair: M.A. Zaitz, IBM, Hopewell Junction, NY, Zaitz@us.ibm.com

Invited talks to be announced.

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS
Chair:W.T. Elam, Ametek/EDAX Research Group and Univ. of Washington APL, Seattle, WA,
wtelam@apl.washington.edu

Title to be announced.
P. Van Espen, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium

Contributed Abstracts

Abstracts are hereby solicited for oral presentation in any of the special sessions listed, or the XRD and XRF poster sessions. Not all contributed abstracts submitted for oral presentation will be placed in a special session, but rather, will default to poster presentation. Poster sessions will be held on Monday and Tuesday evening of conference week, in conjunction with the evening receptions. Abstracts of more general interest will be placed in oral sessions. The Organizing Committee considers the withdrawal of an abstract after it has been accepted and adver tised as highly nonprofessional (except in special circumstances). Please try to secure travel funding and approvals before submitting your abstract.

GUIDELINES FOR PREPARING ABSTRACTS

Abstracts are reproduced as submitted in the Book of Abstracts, and will also be published on the Denver X-ray Conference website, with links to, or duplicate copies on other affiliated websites (e.g., ICDD). If you do not want your abstract so published, please note your request on the information page of your abstract submission. Abstracts must not exceed one page in length and must include the title, author(s), affiliation(s) and the text.

How to write an Abstract (pdf) by Dr. Victor E. Buhrke

To provide uniformity, abstracts must be prepared according to the following guidelines:

Abstract Format

▼ Paper Size: 8.5 x 11 inches; A4 paper must be formatted for 8.5 x 11 inches.
▼ Size: Entire abstract, including title, author(s), affiliation(s), and text, must fit into a maximum area of 15 cm (5.9") wide by 20 cm (7.9") high.
▼ Font: Times or Times New Roman, 12 point.
▼ Title: Bold, centered
▼ Author(s) and affiliation(s): centered; if there is more than one author, under line the presenting author’s name.
▼ Leave two blank lines before beginning the text.

▼ Text:
▲ Text should appear flush left; do not indent.
▲ Use line spacing sufficiently large enough to allow the abstract to be read easily,
including subscripts, superscripts and Greek letters.
▲ A blank line is recommended (space permitting) between paragraphs.

Information File

In addition to the abstract, please submit a separate file with the following information:
▼ Contact name, mailing address, phone number, fax number, and e-mail address.
▼ Permission to post abstract on the DXC website and affiliated websites.
▼ Indicate your preference (oral presentation or poster):
▲ If oral presentation is preferred, suggest session where paper may be best suited
▲ If poster presentation is preferred, choose either XRD or XRF
▼ If your submission is invited, please indicate that your paper is invited and include the chairperson’s name that issued your invitation along with the session title.
▼ Indicate whether you intend to publish this paper in the DXC proceedings. If you do not plan on publishing, please explain why.

Abstract Submission

Abstracts for Poster Presentation are still being accepted.
Click here for online submission.

Abstracts may be submitted online or by e-mail:
1. Online: submit here
2. E-mail: Send to dxc@icdd.com as an attached file created in:
a) Microsoft® Word (Word 97–Word 2007)(preferred format)
b) Adobe® PDF
Please note:
▼ Special characters, tables, mathematical formulae and figures should be kept to a
minimum.
▼ If special symbols or Greek letters are used, please limit the fonts to those that are
available with the standard distribution of Microsoft® Word. Nonstandard fonts may
lead to errors in transmission.
▼ All graphics must be embedded in the Word document.
Receipt of abstracts will be confirmed via e-mail. If you do not receive your confirmation within two weeks of your submission, please contact:
Denise Zulli, Conference Coordinator
zulli@icdd.com
Phone: 610.325.9814