The 2008 Denver X-ray Conference would like to thank the following sponsors:

Panalytical

Chemplex

Ge Inspection Technologies

Thermo

Thank you to our Media Sponsor:

Materials Today

Journal of X-Ray Science & Technology

Program:

programs

The Denver X-ray Conference Call for Papers

DXC 2008 - Plenary Session "Stress Analysis"
4 - 8 August 2008
Denver Marriott Tech Center Hotel
Denver, Colorado

Deadline for Submission of Abstracts has been extended until March 7

See Call for Papers (PDF)

Joint meeting with the Eight International Conference on Residual Stresses

Contributed Abstracts
Abstracts are hereby solicited for oral presentation in any of the special sessions listed, or the XRD and XRF poster sessions. Not all contributed abstracts submitted for oral presentation will be placed in a special session, but rather, will default to poster presentation. Poster sessions will be held on Monday and Tuesday evening of conference week, in conjunction with the evening receptions. Abstracts of more general interest will be placed in oral sessions. The Organizing Committee considers the withdrawal of an abstract after it has been accepted and adver tised as highly nonprofessional (except in special circumstances). Please try to secure travel funding and approvals before submitting your abstract.

Workshops Monday & Tuesday 4–5 August

The exact date & time of each workshop will not be determined until April 2008.
Attendees will be required to sign up for individual workshops when registering.

XRD & XRF

 
Cultural Heritage and Conservation Applications—Full day  
Organizer & Instructors:
K. Trentelman, Getty Conservation Institute, Los Angeles, CA, ktrentelman@getty.edu
L. Glinsman, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
A. Drews, Ford Research & Advanced Engineering, Dearborn, MI
C. McGlinchey, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY
This workshop will explore the application of XRF and XRD to the study of cultural heritage materials. Lectures will describe the types of questions about works of art these techniques are used to help answer; the limitations of analyzing works of art, where sampling or even touching the object may not be allowed; the types of instrumentation that have been utilized in this field over the past several decades; and the optimization of portable XRF instruments. In addition, a panel discussion and hands-on session will explore further the issues and challenges involved in the analysis of works of art.
Nanomaterials and Their Applications  
Organizers & Instructors:
R.L. Snyder, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, bob.snyder@mse.gatech.edu
V. Petkov, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI, petkov@phy.cmich.edu
Z.L. Wang, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA
B. Bunker, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN
This workshop will focus on the synthesis, applications and characterization of nanomaterials. We will begin with a broad survey of their synthesis and unusual properties with a wide survey of their applications. We will then move on to focus on the ways we can characterize these atomic and molecular structured materials.
   

XRD

 
Introduction to Rietveld  
Organizer & Instructors:
J.A. Kaduk, INEOS Technologies, Naperville, IL, James.Kaduk@ineos.com
Instructors to be announced.
Description to be announced.
High-throughput X-rays  
Organizer & Instructors:
B. Toby, Argonne National Laboratory–APS, Argonne, IL, brian.toby@anl.gov
Instructors to be announced.
New powder diffraction methods and instrumentation, particularly at synchrotron X-ray sources, have greatly expanded experimental capabilities. Complete high quality diffraction measurements, with a data range suitable for pair distribution analysis, can be collected in a fraction of a second. The new 11-BM instrument at the APS offers high resolution diffraction patterns, optimal for indexing, structure solution and refinement, which can be collected in less than an hour. This 11-BM instrument will be available to the public for mail-in use—a first for US powder diffraction. The goals of this half-day workshop are to provide an overview to the instrumentation utilized for high-throughput diffraction capabilities and some background on the support infrastructure needed to support high-throughput work. In the case of the 11-BM diffractometer, attendees will learn about how to use this instrument for their own research.
Combined Use of X-rays and Neutrons
 
Organizer & Instructors:
A. Huq, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge, TN, huqa@ornl.gov
J. Hodges, L. Coates, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge, TN
X-rays and Neutrons are complementary scattering techniques for characterizing structures and dynamics of materials of interest that range from solid state oxides to proteins. Neutron scattering lengths are independent of the atomic number of elements as a result of which neutrons can distinguish between isotopes of the same element and are good at detecting light elements in the presence of heavier elements in families of compounds such as metal oxide, hydrides, etc. In biological samples, one can make use of the substitution of hydrogen with deuterium to locate their position. This half-day workshop will be dedicated to understanding the fundamentals of using both X-rays and Neutrons along with specific examples of how to analyze combined sets of X-ray and Neutron data from the same sample.
Texture Analysis with Area Detectors  
Organizers & Instructors:
B. B. He, Bruker AXS, Inc., Madison, WI, bob.he@bruker-axs.com
T. N. Blanton, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, NY, tblanton@icdd.com
R. Tissot, Sandia National Labs, Albuquerque
U. Preckwinkel, Bruker AXS, Inc. Madison, WI





Advantages of area detectors for texture analysis have been well recognized by many users. Compared to point or line detectors, texture can be measured using area detectors with high sensitivity, high speed and high accuracy. Area detectors can reveal the microstructure and texture information simultaneously. Texture measurement is extremely fast since diffraction intensities and backgrounds for multiple poles and multiple directions can be measured simultaneously. The orientation relationship between different layers of films or coating and substrate can be accurately measured since all diffraction patterns of all layers and substrate are collected with the same sample orientations. This workshop will cover the recent progress in theory, instrumentation, data collection and analysis strategy with area detectors for texture analysis.
ICRS-8 Workshop on Stress Analysis (full day)  
Organizers:
I.C. Noyan, Columbia University, New York, NY, icn2@columbia.edu
M. Prime, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, prime@lanl.gov
This workshop will cover stress determination techniques using mechanical and diffraction methods as well as briefly reviewing basics of stress/strain and residual stress. It will be a basic tutorial aimed at engineers starting out to make such measurements, select measurement techniques, or just understand and interpret results. We will cover hole drilling, slitting, contour, layer removal and eigenstress analysis, as well as neutron and X-ray diffraction techniques.
Non-ambient XRD  
Organizer & Instructors:
S.T. Misture, NYS College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, NY, misture@alfred.edu
E.A. Payzant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN
S. Skinner, Imperial College London, London, England
C. Resch, Anton Paar GmbH, Graz, Austria
Description to be announced.

XRF

 
XRF Specimen Preparation (full day)
 
Organizer & Instructors:
J.A. Anzelmo, Anzelmo & Associates, Inc., Madison, WI, jaanzelmo@aol.com
D. Broton, CTL Group, Skokie, IL
L. Arias, Bruker AXS, Madison, WI
J. Metz, Sharp and Howells Pty Ltd, Bulleen, Australia
The workshop will begin in the morning with a review of simple ratio method techniques and continue through more advanced internal ratio preparation methods of analysis involving the fusion process (Metz). A discussion of sample preparation physics and a detailed discussion of the fusion method of sample preparation will follow (Anzelmo). The afternoon session will begin with an overview of the sampling process including equipment and techniques starting from the bulk sample through specimen preparation (Broton). This will be followed by a detailed description of liquid analysis techniques and equipment (Arias).
Quantitative Analysis (full day)  
Organizer & Instructors:
M. Mantler, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria, michael.mantler@ifp.tuwien.ac.at
B. Vrebos, PANalytical, Almelo, The Netherlands
W.T. Elam, EDAX/University of Washington, Redmond, WA
Part 1 (Morning):
1. Classical fundamental parameter models and
mathematical foundation.
2. Fundamental parameter models for thin films
(introduction).
3. Coherent and incoherent scattering (introduction).
4. Compensation Methods.
5. Obtaining net intensities (includes background
subtraction, line overlaps).
Part 2 (Afternoon):
1. Analysis of thin films.
2. Modeling (computing) of inc+coh scattering,
polarization.
3. EDS: Detector response function.
4. EDS: Background subtraction.
5. EDS: Artifacts in spectra.
Basic XRF  
Organizers & Instructors:
W.T. Elam, Edax/University of Washington, Redmond, WA, wtelam@apl.washington.edu
G.J. Havrilla, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, havrilla@lanl.gov
Instructors to be announced.
This workshop provides a basic introduction to the principles of XRF, and is specifically aimed at those new to the field. It will consist of a general overview of the technique, followed by more specific details of the basic principles with emphasis on understanding how to use XRF and what its capabilities are. A few particular applications will be presented to provide an understanding of how the basic principles affect actual practice.
Trace Analysis
 
Organizer & Instructors:
P. Wobrauschek, Atominstitut—TU Wien, Vienna, Austria, wobi@ati.ac.at
Instructors to be announced.
Motivation to analyze sample on their trace element contents are many fold, mostly driven by possible health hazards of some chemical elements, but also while observing changing material characteristics.Trace analysis requires hysical and technical efforts to improve detection limits in XRF. A variety of approaches are available as modern excitation sources and X-ray optics to improve the beam quality, excitation geometries can be varied from conventional 45 degree incidence to gracing incidence leading to TXRF. Sample preparation techniques like micro spots using nanoliter to picoliter droplets open new interesting fields of applications. Impact and importance on a wide range of materials including environmental and biological systems will be given.
Energy Dispersive XRF
 
Organizer & Instructors:
B. Scruggs, EDAX, Inc., Mahwah, NJ, Bruce.Scruggs@Ametek.com
J. Heckel, Spectro Analytical, Kleve, Germany
C. Streli, P. Wobrauschek, Atominstitut—Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria
The Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) workshop provides a comprehensive review of XRF spectroscopy for both the beginner and experienced X-ray spectroscopist. Topics to be covered are instrumentation including sources and detectors, and qualitative and quantitative analysis. Applications will be discussed including mobile, online, bulk and micro ED-XRF analyses.

Sessions Wednesday, Thursday & Friday 6-8 August

The exact date and time of each session will not be determined until April 2008.

PLENARY SESSION

 
Stress and Society Chairs:
I.C. Noyan, Columbia University, New York, NY, icn2@columbia.edu
M. Prime, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, prime@lanl.gov
E. Üstündag, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, ustundag@iastate.edu
MORE MILES FOR TIRED IRON: THE APPLICATION OF RESIDUAL STRESSES TO AGING AIRCRAFT
M. Shepard, US Air Force Research Laboratory, WPAFB, OH
AN INTEGRATED VIEW OF MATERIALS STATE AWARENESS: DEALING WITH MISSING AND UNCERTAIN INFORMATION
R.B. Thompson, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
DENTAL STRESS, MECHANICAL NOT PSYCHOLOGICAL, EVEN SOME RESIDUAL STRESS
M. Bagby, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia
RESIDUAL STRESSES IN THE U.S. NUCLEAR POWER INDUSTRY
A.A. Csontos, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.

XRD AND XRF

 
Cultural Heritage
Chair: K. Trentelman, Getty Conservation Institute, Los Angeles, CA, ktrentelman@getty.edu
CONFOCAL XRF OF PAINTINGS
J. Mass, Winterthur Museum and Country Estate, Winterthur, DE
PORTABLE XRD/XRF INSTRUMENTATION FOR THE STUDY OF WORKS OF ART
G. Chiari, Getty Conservation Institute, Los Angeles CA
XRF DETECTION OF HEAVY METAL PESTICIDES IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL ARTIFACTS
A. Shugar, Buffalo State College, Buffalo NY
New Developments in XRD & XRF Instrumentation Chair: V.E. Buhrke, Consultant, Portola Valley, CA, vebuhrke@sbcglobal.net
Abstracts should be submitted by technical representatives of a manufacturer. They should discuss specifications, and applications concerning one of their newest and most important products. Talks should include comments about software, XRD and XRF equipment, and accessories. No mention of prices or a comparison with competitors’ products can be included.
Analysis of Nanomaterials (full day) Chairs: R.L. Snyder, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, bob.snyder@mse.gatech.edu
V. Petkov, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI, petkov@phy.cmich.edu
NANOGENERATORS AND NANOPIEZETRONICS
Z.L. Wang, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA
XAFS STUDIES OF NANOSYSTEMS: HOW X-RAY, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, AND OPTICAL TECHNIQUES EACH CONTRIBUTE TO STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION
B. Bunker, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN
NATURAL NANOPARTICLE SHAPE, STRUCTURE, PROPERTIES AND REACTIVITY FROM X-RAY STUDIES
G.A. Waychunas, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA
HARD X-RAY FULL FIELD 3D IMAGING WITH SUB-50 NM RESOLUTION
A. Tkachuk, Xradia, Concord, CA
STRUCTURE AND KINETICS OF SELF-ASSEMBLED NANOCRYSTALLINE SYSTEMS PROBED BY SMALL ANGLE
X-RAY SCATTERING TECHNIQUES
X.-M. Lin, Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL
Thin Films
Chairs: T.N. Blanton, Eastman Kodak Company Research Labs, Rochester, NY, tblanton@icdd.com
T. Huang, Emeritus, IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA
DETERMINATION OF CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC POLARITY OF THIN FILMS USING HIGH RESOLUTION XRD
K. Inaba, Rigaku Corporation, Tokyo, Japan
Microbeam X-ray Analysis

Chair: K. Tsuji, Osaka City University, Osaka, Japan, tsuji@a-chem.eng.osaka-cu.ac.jp
Co-chair: G.J. Havrilla, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM
INVITED TALKS TO BE ANNOUNCED.
X-ray Microimaging

Chair: Q. Shen, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL and APS—Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, qshen@aps.anl.gov
IMAGING MATERIALS SPECIMENS USING X-RAY NANO-CT
P. Pianetta, Stanford University, Menlo Park, CA
ULTRAFAST X-RAY MICRO-IMAGING OF TRANSIENT FLUID DYNAMICS
K. Fezzaa, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL

XRD

 
High Temperature In-situ Analysis Chair: S.T. Misture, NYS College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, NY, misture@alfred.edu
IN-SITU CHARACTERIZATION OF NOVEL FUEL CELL MATERIALS
S. Skinner, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
Energy Conversion Materials Chair: S.T. Misture, NYS College of Ceramics at Alfred University, Alfred, NY, misture@alfred.edu
INVITED TALKS TO BE ANNOUNCED.  
Industrial Applications of XRD Chairs: R.L. Snyder, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, bob.snyder@mse.gatech.edu
E.A. Payzant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, payzanta@ornl.gov
PROBING THIN-LAYERED AND NANO-STRUCTURED MATERIALS—X-RAY SCATTERING TOOLS
J. Woitok, PANalytical, Almelo, The Netherlands
X-RAY ANALYSIS OF CEMENT ADDITIVES AND CONCRETE ADMIXTURES AT W.R. GRACE
J. Nicolich, W.R. Grace & Co., Cambridge, MA
Small Angle Scattering Chair: J. Ilavsky, APS – Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, Ilavsky@aps.anl.gov
INVITED TALKS TO BE ANNOUNCED  

XRF

 
Regulatory Applications Chair: W.T. Elam, Edax/University of Washington, Redmond, WA, wtelam@apl.washington.edu
TITLE TO BE ANNOUNCED.
S. Piorek, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Billerica, MA
Fusion & Industrial Applications of XRF Chair: J.A. Anzelmo, Anzelmo & Associates, Inc., Madison, WI, jaanzelmo@aol.com

APPLICATIONS OF XRF IN THE OIL INDUSTRY
R. Morton, Conoco Phillips, Bartelsville, OK
FURTHER STUDIES OF THE BORATE FUSION METHOD OF SAMPLE PREPARATION
M. Loubser, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa

Quantitative Analysis Chair: W.T. Elam, Edax/University of Washington, Redmond, WA, wtelam@apl.washington.edu
GENERATING RELIABLE QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE XRF RESULTS TO SUPPORT FDA LAB AND FIELD
INVESTIGATIONS
P. Palmer, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA and R. Jacobs, FDA, Alameda, CA
Trace Analysis Chair: M.A. Zaitz, IBM, Hopewell Junction, NY, zaitz@us.ibm.com
INVITED TALKS TO BE ANNOUNCED.
 

The 8th International Conference on Residual Stresses (ICRS-8)

Workshop: “Stress Analysis” Tuesday, 5 August (see description)
Oral Sessions: Wednesday–Friday, 6–8 August

Dinner and Poster Session:
The traditional ICRS Conference Dinner will be held on Thursday night. Dinner costs are included in the ICRS registration fee. A limited number of dinner tickets may be available the first day of the conference. ICRS-8 will have one poster session in order to provide an opportunity for authors and attendees to interact. The poster session will start before the ICRS Conference Dinner Thursday night and posters will be available for viewing after the dinner as well.

Abstracts are hereby solicited for the following Special Sessions:

Industrial Applications

 
Engineered Residual Stresses and Industrial Applications Chairs: J. Bunch, The Boeing Company, Seattle, WA, jeffrey.o.bunch@f22.boeing.com
M. Hill, University of California, Davis, CA, mrhill@ucdavis.edu
Residual Stress in Materials Engineering Chairs: C. Murray, IBM - T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY, conal@us.ibm.com
T. Gnaupel-Herold, NIST Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg, MD, tg-h@nist.gov
Residual Stress Induced Distortions and Other Effects Distortion, Effect on Material Property Measurements, Failures, Stability Chair: M. Prime, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, prime@lanl.gov
Relaxation Techniques for Residual Stress Measurement Slitting (Compliance), Hole Drilling, Contour, Deep Hole, Indentation, and Others Chairs: M. Hill, University of California, Davis, CA, mrhill@ucdavis.edu
M. Prime, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, prime@lanl.gov

Diffraction Techniques for Stress Measurement

 

Neutron Diffraction Measurement of Residual Stress
Chairs: D. Brown, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, dbrown@lanl.gov
X.-L. Wang, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, wangxl@ornl.gov
Synchrotrons: Macrobeam and High Energy Techniques Chairs: M. Daymond, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, daymond@me.queensu.ca
J. Almer, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, almer@aps.anl.gov
Synchrotrons: Microbeam Techniques
Chairs: G. Ice, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, icege@ornl.gov
N. Tamura, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, ntamura@lbl.gov
Laboratory X-ray Techniques Chairs: C. Goldsmith, IBM Corporation, Hopewell Junction, NY, cgoldsmi@us.ibm.com
T. Watkins, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, watkinstr@ornl.gov

Other Damage Evaluation and Residual Stress Determination Techniques

 
  Chair: J. Gray, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, jngray@iastate.edu

Modeling of Residual Stresses and Mechanical Response

 
Modeling Stress Formation and Processes Chair: C. Tome, Los Alamos National Laboratories, Los Alamos, NM, tome@lanl.gov
Modeling of the Mechanical Response of Structures with Residual Stresses Chair: I. Beyerlein, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, irene@lanl.gov

Eigenstrain and Hybrid Numerical- Experimental Methods

Chair: M. Hill, University of California, Davis, CA, mrhill@ucdavis.edu
   

Future Directions and Challenges in Residual Stress Analysis

Moderators: E. Üstündag, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, ustundag@iastate.edu
M. Prime, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, prime@lanl.gov